Arquivos Mensais: junho 2020

The Man Who Knew Javanese

by Lima Barreto


In a confectionery, my friend Castro once told me the pranks I had played on convictions and respectability in order to live.
There was even, on a given occasion, when I was in Manaus, when I was forced to hide my quality as a bachelor, in order to obtain more confidence from the clients, who came to my office as a sorcerer and diviner. I told that.
My friend listened to me quietly, in rapture, liking that my experienced Gil Blas, until, in a pause in the conversation, when we ran out of glasses, he observed haphazardly:
– You’ve been leading a very funny life, Castelo!
– Only in this way can one live … This is a unique occupation: leaving the house at certain hours, returning at other times, it is boring, don’t you think? I don’t know how I got on there, at the consulate!
– Get tired; but, this is not what I admire. What amazes me is that you have run so many adventures here, in this stupid and bureaucratic Brazil.
– Which one! Right here, my dear Castro, beautiful pages of life can be found. Imagine that I was a Javanese teacher!
– When? Here, after you returned from the consulate?
– Not; before. And, by the way, I was appointed consul for that.
– Tell me how it went. Do you drink more beer?
– I drink.
We sent for another bottle, filled the glasses, and continued:
– I had just arrived in Rio I was literally destitute. I was on the run from a pension house in a pension house, not knowing where and how to make money, when I read in the Jornal do Comércio the following announcement:
“A Javanese language teacher is needed. Letters, etc.” Now, he said to me, there is a position there that will not have many competitors; if I had four words, I would introduce myself. I left the cafe and walked the streets, always imagining myself a Javanese teacher, earning money, riding a tram and without unpleasant encounters with the “corpses”. Insensibly I went to the National Library. I wasn’t sure which book to order; but I went in, gave the hat to the doorman, received the password and went upstairs. On the stairs, I came to ask the Grande Encyclopédie, letter J, in order to consult the article on Java and the Javanese language. No sooner said than done. I learned, after a few minutes, that Java was a large island in the Sonda archipelago, a Dutch colony, and that Javanese, the binding language of the Maleo-Polynesian group, had a noteworthy literature written in characters derived from the old Hindu alphabet.
The Encyclopédie gave me an indication of works on the Malay language and I had no doubts in consulting one of them. I copied the alphabet, its figurative pronunciation and left. I walked the streets, wandering and chewing letters. In my head, hieroglyphics danced; from time to time I consulted my notes;

I would go into the gardens and write these calungas on the sand to keep them in my memory and get my hand used to writing them.
At night, when I was able to enter the house without being seen, to avoid indiscreet questions from the supervisor, I still continued in the room to swallow my Malay “a-b-c”, and with such determination I carried the purpose that, in the morning, I knew it perfectly.
I convinced myself that it was the easiest language in the world and I left; but not so soon that I did not meet the person in charge of renting the rooms:
– Senhor Castelo, when do you pay your bill?
Then I answered him, with the most charming hope:
– Soon … Wait a minute … Be patient … I will be appointed Javanese teacher, and …
Then the man interrupted me:
– What the hell is that, Lord Castle?
I enjoyed the fun and attacked the man’s patriotism:
– It is a language that is spoken there by the bands of Timor. Do you know where it is?
Oh! naive soul! The man forgot my debt and said to me with that strong Portuguese speaking:
– I’m here for me, I’m not sure; but I heard that there are lands that we have there for the sides of Macau. And do you know that, Senhor Castelo?
Excited by this happy departure that the Javanese gave me, I went back to looking for the ad. There he was. I resolutely decided to apply to the ocean language professor. I wrote the answer, went through the newspaper and left the letter there. Then I went back to the library and continued my Javanese studies. I did not make much progress that day, I do not know whether because I considered the Javanese alphabet the only knowledge necessary for a Malay language teacher or if I was more involved in the bibliography and literary history of the language I was going to teach.
After two days, I received a letter to speak to Dr. Manuel Feliciano Soares Albernaz, Baron de Jacuecanga, at Rua Conde de Bonfim, I don’t remember what number. And I must not forget that in the meantime I continued to study my Malay, that is, the Javanese. In addition to the alphabet, I learned the names of some authors, also ask and answer “how are you?” – and two or three grammar rules, backed up by 20 words from the lexicon.
You cannot imagine the great difficulties I struggled with, to arrange the four hundred réis of the trip! It is easier – you can be sure – to learn Javanese … I went on foot. I arrived very sweaty; and, With maternal affection, the years old mango trees, which were outlined in a lane in front of the proprietor’s house, received me, welcomed me and comforted me. In my whole life, it was the only moment when I came to feel the sympathy of nature ..

– The old man, I amended, listened to me attentively, considered my physique for a long time, seemed to think that I was in fact the son of a Malay and asked me sweetly:
– So you are willing to teach me Javanese?
– The answer came out unintentionally: – Yes.
– You will be amazed, added Barão de Jacuecanga, that I, at this age, still want to learn anything, but …
– I don’t have to admire it. Have you seen examples and very fruitful examples …?
– What I want, my dear sir ….
– Castle, I went on.
– What I want, my dear Senhor Castelo, is to fulfill a family oath. I don’t know if you know that I am the grandson of Counselor Albernaz, the one who accompanied Pedro I when he abdicated. Returning from London, he brought here a book in a strange language, which he was very fond of. It was a Hindu or Siamese who had given it to me, in London, out of thanks to I don’t know what service my grandfather had provided. When my grandfather died, he called my father and said: “Son, I have this book here, written in Javanese. He told me who gave it to me that he avoids misfortunes and brings happiness to those who have it. I don’t know anything for sure. In in any case, keep it; but if you want the fado that the oriental sage laid down for me to be fulfilled, make sure your son understands it, so that our race will always be happy. ” My father, the old baron continued, did not believe the story much; however, he kept the book. At death’s door, he gave it to me and told me what he had promised his father. At first, I did not make much of the story of the book. I laid him in a corner and made my life. I even forgot about him; but, from time to time, I have gone through so much heartbreak, so many misfortunes have fallen on my old age that I remembered the family talisman. I have to read it, understand it, if I don’t want my last days to announce the disaster of my posterity; and, to understand it, of course, I need to understand Javanese. Here it is.
He fell silent and I noticed that the old man’s eyes had dewed. He discreetly wiped his eyes and asked me if I wanted to see that book. I said yes. He called the servant, gave him the instructions and explained to me that he had lost all his children, nephews, with only one married daughter left, whose offspring, however, was reduced to a son, weak in body and in fragile and fluctuating health.
The book came. It was an old calmaço, an old room, bound in leather, printed in large letters, on thick yellowed paper. The cover sheet was missing and therefore the date of printing could not be read. There were also some preface pages, written in English, where I read that these were the stories of Prince Kulanga, Javanese writer of great merit.
I immediately informed the old baron that, not realizing that I had arrived there through English, he kept my Malay knowledge in high regard. I was still leafing through the Cartapácio, like someone who knows that kind of vasconço masterfully, until at last we contracted the price and time conditions, committing myself to make him read the carob before a year.
Soon I was teaching my first lesson, but the old man was not as diligent as I was. I couldn’t learn to distinguish and write even four letters. Anyway, with half the alphabet it took us a month and Senhor Barão de Jacuecanga was not very master of the subject: he learned and unlearned.

The daughter and son-in-law (I think they knew nothing about the story of the book until then) came to hear about the old man’s study; they didn’t bother. They found it funny and thought it was a good thing to distract him.
But with what you will be amazed, my dear Castro, it is with the admiration that the son-in-law was having for the Javanese teacher. What a unique thing! He never tired of repeating: “It is a wonder! So young! If I knew that, ah! where were you !”
Dona Maria da Glória’s husband (as the baron’s daughter was called), was a judge, a related and powerful man; but he was not afraid to show his admiration for my Javanese before the whole world. On the other hand, the baron was delighted. After two months, he had given up on learning and asked me to translate, every other day, an excerpt from the enchanted book. It was enough to understand him, he told me; nothing was opposed to someone translating it and hearing it. This way he avoided the fatigue of the study and fulfilled the task.
You know well that to this day I know nothing of Javanese, but I composed some very silly stories and forced them on the old man as a chronicle. How he heard that nonsense! …
He was ecstatic, as if he were hearing the words of an angel. And I grew up in your eyes!
He made me live in his house, he filled me with gifts, he increased my salary. Finally, he passed a well-deserved life.
The fact that he came to receive an inheritance from a forgotten relative who lived in Portugal contributed a lot to this. The good old man attributed it to my Javanese; and I was almost to believe it too.
I was losing my remorse; but, in any case, I was always afraid that someone who knew the Malaysian puma would appear in front of me. And my fear was great, when the sweet baron sent me with a letter to the Viscount of Caruru, to get me into diplomacy. I objected to him: my ugliness, the lack of elegance, my Tagalog aspect. – “Come on!” He said. Go, boy; you know Javanese! ” I sent the viscount to the Foreigners’ Office with several recommendations. It was a success.
The director called the heads of section: “Look, a man who knows Javanese – what a portent!”
The section heads took me to the officers and amanuenses and there was one of them who looked at me more with hate than with envy or admiration. And everyone said, “So you know Javanese? Is it difficult? There is no one who knows it here!”
The amanuensis, who looked at me with hatred, then helped: “It’s true, but I know canaque. Do you know?” I said no and I went to the minister’s presence.
The high authority stood up, put his hands on the chairs, fixed the pince-nez on his nose and asked, “So, do you know Javanese?” I said yes; and, on his question where he had learned it, I told him the story of that Javanese father. “Well, the minister said to me, you shouldn’t go to diplomacy; your physique is no good … The best thing would be a consulate in Asia or Oceania. For now, there is no vacancy, but I am going to reform and you will come in. From today on, however, I am attached to my ministry and I want you to leave for Bale next year, where you will represent Brazil at the Linguistics Congress. Study, read Hovelacque, Max Müller, and others ! “
Imagine that I knew nothing about Javanese until then, but I was employed and would represent Brazil in a congress of scholars.

The old baron died, passed the book on to his son-in-law so that he could reach his grandson, when he was of an appropriate age, and made a cue in my will.
I began with enthusiasm in the study of the Maltese-Polynesian languages; but there was no way!
Well-dined, well-dressed, well-slept, he didn’t have the energy to get those weird things into the cache. I bought books, subscribed to magazines: Revue Anthropologique et Linguistique, Proceedings of the English-Oceanic Association, Archivo Glottologico Italiano, the devil, but nothing! And my fame grew. On the street, those informed pointed me out, saying to the others: “There goes the guy who knows Javanese.” In bookstores, grammarians consulted me about the placement of pronouns in the jargon of the Sonda Islands. I received letters from scholars in the countryside, the newspapers cited my knowledge and I refused to accept a group of students eager to understand this Javanese. At the invitation of the newsroom, I wrote, in the Jornal do Comércio, a four-column article on ancient and modern Javanese literature …
– How, if you knew nothing? attentive Castro interrupted me.
– Quite simply: first, I described the island of Java, with the help of dictionaries and a few geographies, and then I mentioned the most not being able.
– And you never doubted? my friend asked me.
– Never. That is, once I almost get lost. The police arrested a guy, a sailor, a tanned guy who only spoke a strange language. Several interpreters were called, no one understood him. I was also called, with all the respect that my wisdom deserved, of course. I was slow to go, but I went after all. The man was already free, thanks to the intervention of the Dutch consul, to whom he made himself understood with half a dozen Dutch words. And the sailor was Javanese – uf!
Finally, the time for the congress came, and there I went to Europe. Delicious! I attended the opening and the preparatory sessions. They signed me up in the Tupi-Guarani section and I moved to Paris. Before that, however, I published my portrait, biographical and bibliographic notes in the Messenger of Bale. When I returned, the president apologized for giving me that section; I did not know my work and thought that, because I was a Brazilian American, the Tupi-Guarani section was naturally indicated to me. I accepted the explanations and even today I have not been able to write my works about Javanese, to send him, as I promised.
After the congress, I published extracts from the article by the Messenger of Bale, in Berlin, Turin and Paris, where the readers of my works offered me a banquet, chaired by Senator Gorot. It cost me all this game, including the banquet that was offered to me, about ten thousand francs, almost all the inheritance of the credulous and good Baron de Jacuecanga.
I didn’t waste my time or my money. I became a national glory and, when jumping on the Pharoux pier, I received an ovation from all walks of life and the President of the Republic, days later, invited me to lunch with him.
Within six months I was dispatched consul in Havana, where I was for six years and where I will return, in order to improve my studies of the languages ​​of Malay, Melanesia and Polynesia.

– It’s fantastic, observed Castro, grabbing the beer glass.
– Look: if I wasn’t going to be happy, do you know it would be?
– What?
– Eminent bacteriologist. Let’s go?
– Let’s go.
Gazeta da Tarde, Rio.28-4-l9ll.

O HOMEM QUE SABIA JAVANÊS

LIMA BARRETO

Em uma confeitaria, certa vez, ao meu amigo Castro, contava eu as partidas que havia pregado às convicções e às respeitabilidades, para poder viver.
Houve mesmo, uma dada ocasião, quando estive em Manaus, em que fui obrigado a esconder a minha qualidade de bacharel, para mais confiança obter dos clientes, que afluíam ao meu escritório de feiticeiro e adivinho. Contava eu isso.
O meu amigo ouvia-me calado, embevecido, gostando daquele meu Gil Blas vivido, até que, em uma pausa da conversa, ao esgotarmos os copos, observou a esmo:
— Tens levado uma vida bem engraçada, Castelo !
— Só assim se pode viver… Isto de uma ocupação única: sair de casa a certas horas, voltar a outras, aborrece, não achas? Não sei como me tenho agüentado lá, no consulado !
— Cansa-se; mas, não é disso que me admiro. O que me admira, é que tenhas corrido tantas aventuras aqui, neste Brasil imbecil e burocrático.
— Qual! Aqui mesmo, meu caro Castro, se podem arranjar belas páginas de vida. Imagina tu que eu já fui professor de javanês!
— Quando? Aqui, depois que voltaste do consulado?
— Não; antes. E, por sinal, fui nomeado cônsul por isso.
— Conta lá como foi. Bebes mais cerveja?
— Bebo.
Mandamos buscar mais outra garrafa, enchemos os copos, e continuei:
— Eu tinha chegado havia pouco ao Rio estava literalmente na miséria. Vivia fugido de casa de pensão em casa de pensão, sem saber onde e como ganhar dinheiro, quando li no Jornal do Comércio o anuncio seguinte:
“Precisa-se de um professor de língua javanesa. Cartas, etc.” Ora, disse cá comigo, está ali uma colocação que não terá muitos concorrentes; se eu capiscasse quatro palavras, ia apresentar-me. Saí do café e andei pelas ruas, sempre a imaginar-me professor de javanês, ganhando dinheiro, andando de bonde e sem encontros desagradáveis com os “cadáveres”. Insensivelmente dirigi-me à Biblioteca Nacional. Não sabia bem que livro iria pedir; mas, entrei, entreguei o chapéu ao porteiro, recebi a senha e subi. Na escada, acudiu-me pedir a Grande Encyclopédie, letra J, a fim de consultar o artigo relativo a Java e a língua javanesa. Dito e feito. Fiquei sabendo, ao fim de alguns minutos, que Java era uma grande ilha do arquipélago de Sonda, colônia holandesa, e o javanês, língua aglutinante do grupo maleo-polinésico, possuía uma literatura digna de nota e escrita em caracteres derivados do velho alfabeto hindu.
A Encyclopédie dava-me indicação de trabalhos sobre a tal língua malaia e não tive dúvidas em consultar um deles. Copiei o alfabeto, a sua pronunciação figurada e saí. Andei pelas ruas, perambulando e mastigando letras. Na minha cabeça dançavam hieróglifos; de quando em quando consultava as minhas notas;
entrava nos jardins e escrevia estes calungas na areia para guardá-los bem na memória e habituar a mão a escrevê-los.
À noite, quando pude entrar em casa sem ser visto, para evitar indiscretas perguntas do encarregado, ainda continuei no quarto a engolir o meu “a-b-c” malaio, e, com tanto afinco levei o propósito que, de manhã, o sabia perfeitamente.
Convenci-me que aquela era a língua mais fácil do mundo e saí; mas não tão cedo que não me encontrasse com o encarregado dos aluguéis dos cômodos:
— Senhor Castelo, quando salda a sua conta?
Respondi-lhe então eu, com a mais encantadora esperança:
— Breve… Espere um pouco… Tenha paciência… Vou ser nomeado professor de javanês, e…
Por aí o homem interrompeu-me:
— Que diabo vem a ser isso, Senhor Castelo?
Gostei da diversão e ataquei o patriotismo do homem:
— É uma língua que se fala lá pelas bandas do Timor. Sabe onde é?
Oh! alma ingênua! O homem esqueceu-se da minha dívida e disse-me com aquele falar forte dos portugueses:
— Eu cá por mim, não sei bem; mas ouvi dizer que são umas terras que temos lá para os lados de Macau. E o senhor sabe isso, Senhor Castelo?
Animado com esta saída feliz que me deu o javanês, voltei a procurar o anúncio. Lá estava ele. Resolvi animosamente propor-me ao professorado do idioma oceânico. Redigi a resposta, passei pelo Jornal e lá deixei a carta. Em seguida, voltei à biblioteca e continuei os meus estudos de javanês. Não fiz grandes progressos nesse dia, não sei se por julgar o alfabeto javanês o único saber necessário a um professor de língua malaia ou se por ter me empenhado mais na bibliografia e história literária do idioma que ia ensinar.
Ao cabo de dois dias, recebia eu uma carta para ir falar ao doutor Manuel Feliciano Soares Albernaz, Barão de Jacuecanga, à Rua Conde de Bonfim, não me recordo bem que numero. E preciso não te esqueceres que entrementes continuei estudando o meu malaio, isto é, o tal javanês. Além do alfabeto, fiquei sabendo o nome de alguns autores, também perguntar e responder “como está o senhor?” – e duas ou três regras de gramática, lastrado todo esse saber com vinte palavras do léxico.
Não imaginas as grandes dificuldades com que lutei, para arranjar os quatrocentos réis da viagem! É mais fácil – podes ficar certo – aprender o javanês… Fui a pé. Cheguei suadíssimo; e, Com maternal carinho, as anosas mangueiras, que se perfilavam em alameda diante da casa do titular, me receberam, me acolheram e me reconfortaram. Em toda a minha vida, foi o único momento em que cheguei a sentir a simpatia da natureza…
Era uma casa enorme que parecia estar deserta; estava mal tratada, mas não sei porque me veio pensar que nesse mau tratamento havia mais desleixo e cansaço de viver que mesmo pobreza. Devia haver anos que não era pintada. As paredes descascavam e os beirais do telhado, daquelas telhas vidradas de outros tempos, estavam desguarnecidos aqui e ali, como dentaduras decadentes ou mal cuidadas.
Olhei um pouco o jardim e vi a pujança vingativa com que a tiririca e o carrapicho tinham expulsado os tinhorões e as begônias. Os crótons continuavam, porém, a viver com a sua folhagem de cores mortiças. Bati. Custaram-me a abrir. Veio, por fim, um antigo preto africano, cujas barbas e cabelo de algodão davam à sua fisionomia uma aguda impressão de velhice, doçura e sofrimento.
Na sala, havia uma galeria de retratos: arrogantes senhores de barba em colar se perfilavam enquadrados em imensas molduras douradas, e doces perfis de senhoras, em bandós, com grandes leques, pareciam querer subir aos ares, enfunadas pelos redondos vestidos à balão; mas, daquelas velhas coisas, sobre as quais a poeira punha mais antiguidade e respeito, a que gostei mais de ver foi um belo jarrão de porcelana da China ou da Índia, como se diz. Aquela pureza da louça, a sua fragilidade, a ingenuidade do desenho e aquele seu fosco brilho de luar, diziam-me a mim que aquele objeto tinha sido feito por mãos de criança, a sonhar, para encanto dos olhos fatigados dos velhos desiludidos…
Esperei um instante o dono da casa. Tardou um pouco. Um tanto trôpego, com o lenço de alcobaça na mão, tomando veneravelmente o simonte de antanho, foi cheio de respeito que o vi chegar. Tive vontade de ir-me embora. Mesmo se não fosse ele o discípulo, era sempre um crime mistificar aquele ancião, cuja velhice trazia à tona do meu pensamento alguma coisa de augusto, de sagrado. Hesitei, mas fiquei.
— Eu sou, avancei, o professor de javanês, que o senhor disse precisar.
— Sente-se, respondeu-me o velho. O senhor é daqui, do Rio?
— Não, sou de Canavieiras.
— Como? fez ele. Fale um pouco alto, que sou surdo, — Sou de Canavieiras, na Bahia, insisti eu. — Onde fez os seus estudos?
— Em São Salvador.
— Em onde aprendeu o javanês? indagou ele, com aquela teimosia peculiar aos velhos.
Não contava com essa pergunta, mas imediatamente arquitetei uma mentira. Contei-lhe que meu pai era javanês. Tripulante de um navio mercante, viera ter à Bahia, estabelecera-se nas proximidades de Canavieiras como pescador, casara, prosperara e fora com ele que aprendi javanês.
— E ele acreditou? E o físico? perguntou meu amigo, que até então me ouvira calado.
— Não sou, objetei, lá muito diferente de um javanês. Estes meus cabelos corridos, duros e grossos e a minha pele basané podem dar-me muito bem o aspecto de um mestiço de malaio…Tu sabes bem que, entre nós, há de tudo: índios, malaios, taitianos, malgaches, guanches, até godos. É uma comparsaria de raças e tipos de fazer inveja ao mundo inteiro.
— Bem, fez o meu amigo, continua.
— O velho, emendei eu, ouviu-me atentamente, considerou demoradamente o meu físico, pareceu que me julgava de fato filho de malaio e perguntou-me com doçura:
— Então está disposto a ensinar-me javanês?
— A resposta saiu-me sem querer: — Pois não.
— O senhor há de ficar admirado, aduziu o Barão de Jacuecanga, que eu, nesta idade, ainda queira aprender qualquer coisa, mas…
— Não tenho que admirar. Têm-se visto exemplos e exemplos muito fecundos… ?
— O que eu quero, meu caro senhor….
— Castelo, adiantei eu.
— O que eu quero, meu caro Senhor Castelo, é cumprir um juramento de família. Não sei se o senhor sabe que eu sou neto do Conselheiro Albernaz, aquele que acompanhou Pedro I, quando abdicou. Voltando de Londres, trouxe para aqui um livro em língua esquisita, a que tinha grande estimação. Fora um hindu ou siamês que lho dera, em Londres, em agradecimento a não sei que serviço prestado por meu avô. Ao morrer meu avô, chamou meu pai e lhe disse: “Filho, tenho este livro aqui, escrito em javanês. Disse-me quem mo deu que ele evita desgraças e traz felicidades para quem o tem. Eu não sei nada ao certo. Em todo o caso, guarda-o; mas, se queres que o fado que me deitou o sábio oriental se cumpra, faze com que teu filho o entenda, para que sempre a nossa raça seja feliz.” Meu pai, continuou o velho barão, não acreditou muito na história; contudo, guardou o livro. Às portas da morte, ele mo deu e disse-me o que prometera ao pai. Em começo, pouco caso fiz da história do livro. Deitei-o a um canto e fabriquei minha vida. Cheguei até a esquecer-me dele; mas, de uns tempos a esta parte, tenho passado por tanto desgosto, tantas desgraças têm caído sobre a minha velhice que me lembrei do talismã da família. Tenho que o ler, que o compreender, se não quero que os meus últimos dias anunciem o desastre da minha posteridade; e, para entendê-lo, é claro, que preciso entender o javanês. Eis aí.
Calou-se e notei que os olhos do velho se tinham orvalhado. Enxugou discretamente os olhos e perguntou-me se queria ver o tal livro. Respondi-lhe que sim. Chamou o criado, deu-lhe as instruções e explicou-me que perdera todos os filhos, sobrinhos, só lhe restando uma filha casada, cuja prole, porém, estava reduzida a um filho, débil de corpo e de saúde frágil e oscilante.
Veio o livro. Era um velho calhamaço, um in-quarto antigo, encadernado em couro, impresso em grandes letras, em um papel amarelado e grosso. Faltava a folha do rosto e por isso não se podia ler a data da impressão. Tinha ainda umas páginas de prefácio, escritas em inglês, onde li que se tratava das histórias do príncipe Kulanga, escritor javanês de muito mérito.
Logo informei disso o velho barão que, não percebendo que eu tinha chegado aí pelo inglês, ficou tendo em alta consideração o meu saber malaio. Estive ainda folheando o cartapácio, à laia de quem sabe magistralmente aquela espécie de vasconço, até que afinal contratamos as condições de preço e de hora, comprometendo-me a fazer com que ele lesse o tal alfarrábio antes de um ano.
Dentro em pouco, dava a minha primeira lição, mas o velho não foi tão diligente quanto eu. Não conseguia aprender a distinguir e a escrever nem sequer quatro letras. Enfim, com metade do alfabeto levamos um mês e o Senhor Barão de Jacuecanga não ficou lá muito senhor da matéria: aprendia e desaprendia.
A filha e o genro (penso que até aí nada sabiam da história do livro) vieram a ter notícias do estudo do velho; não se incomodaram. Acharam graça e julgaram a coisa boa para distraí-lo.
Mas com o que tu vais ficar assombrado, meu caro Castro, é com a admiração que o genro ficou tendo pelo professor de javanês. Que coisa Única! Ele não se cansava de repetir: “É um assombro! Tão moço! Se eu soubesse isso, ah! onde estava !”
O marido de Dona Maria da Glória (assim se chamava a filha do barão), era desembargador, homem relacionado e poderoso; mas não se pejava em mostrar diante de todo o mundo a sua admiração pelo meu javanês. Por outro lado, o barão estava contentíssimo. Ao fim de dois meses, desistira da aprendizagem e pedira-me que lhe traduzisse, um dia sim outro não, um trecho do livro encantado. Bastava entendê-lo, disse-me ele; nada se opunha que outrem o traduzisse e ele ouvisse. Assim evitava a fadiga do estudo e cumpria o encargo.
Sabes bem que até hoje nada sei de javanês, mas compus umas histórias bem tolas e impingi-as ao velhote como sendo do crônicon. Como ele ouvia aquelas bobagens !…
Ficava extático, como se estivesse a ouvir palavras de um anjo. E eu crescia aos seus olhos !
Fez-me morar em sua casa, enchia-me de presentes, aumentava-me o ordenado. Passava, enfim, uma vida regalada.
Contribuiu muito para isso o fato de vir ele a receber uma herança de um seu parente esquecido que vivia em Portugal. O bom velho atribuiu a cousa ao meu javanês; e eu estive quase a crê-lo também.
Fui perdendo os remorsos; mas, em todo o caso, sempre tive medo que me aparecesse pela frente alguém que soubesse o tal patuá malaio. E esse meu temor foi grande, quando o doce barão me mandou com uma carta ao Visconde de Caruru, para que me fizesse entrar na diplomacia. Fiz-lhe todas as objeções: a minha fealdade, a falta de elegância, o meu aspecto tagalo. — “Qual! retrucava ele. Vá, menino; você sabe javanês!” Fui. Mandou-me o visconde para a Secretaria dos Estrangeiros com diversas recomendações. Foi um sucesso.
O diretor chamou os chefes de seção: “Vejam só, um homem que sabe javanês — que portento!”
Os chefes de seção levaram-me aos oficiais e amanuenses e houve um destes que me olhou mais com ódio do que com inveja ou admiração. E todos diziam: “Então sabe javanês? É difícil? Não há quem o saiba aqui!”
O tal amanuense, que me olhou com ódio, acudiu então: “É verdade, mas eu sei canaque. O senhor sabe?” Disse-lhe que não e fui à presença do ministro.
A alta autoridade levantou-se, pôs as mãos às cadeiras, concertou o pince-nez no nariz e perguntou: “Então, sabe javanês?” Respondi-lhe que sim; e, à sua pergunta onde o tinha aprendido, contei-lhe a história do tal pai javanês. “Bem, disse-me o ministro, o senhor não deve ir para a diplomacia; o seu físico não se presta… O bom seria um consulado na Ásia ou Oceania. Por ora, não há vaga, mas vou fazer uma reforma e o senhor entrará. De hoje em diante, porém, fica adido ao meu ministério e quero que, para o ano, parta para Bale, onde vai representar o Brasil no Congresso de Lingüística. Estude, leia o Hovelacque, o Max Müller, e outros!”
Imagina tu que eu até aí nada sabia de javanês, mas estava empregado e iria representar o Brasil em um congresso de sábios.
O velho barão veio a morrer, passou o livro ao genro para que o fizesse chegar ao neto, quando tivesse a idade conveniente e fez-me uma deixa no testamento.
Pus-me com afã no estudo das línguas maleo-polinésicas; mas não havia meio!
Bem jantado, bem vestido, bem dormido, não tinha energia necessária para fazer entrar na cachola aquelas coisas esquisitas. Comprei livros, assinei revistas: Revue Anthropologique et Linguistique, Proceedings of the English-Oceanic Association, Archivo Glottologico Italiano, o diabo, mas nada! E a minha fama crescia. Na rua, os informados apontavam-me, dizendo aos outros: “Lá vai o sujeito que sabe javanês.” Nas livrarias, os gramáticos consultavam-me sobre a colocação dos pronomes no tal jargão das ilhas de Sonda. Recebia cartas dos eruditos do interior, os jornais citavam o meu saber e recusei aceitar uma turma de alunos sequiosos de entenderem o tal javanês. A convite da redação, escrevi, no Jornal do Comércio um artigo de quatro colunas sobre a literatura javanesa antiga e moderna…
— Como, se tu nada sabias? interrompeu-me o atento Castro.
— Muito simplesmente: primeiramente, descrevi a ilha de Java, com o auxílio de dicionários e umas poucas de geografias, e depois citei a mais não poder.
— E nunca duvidaram? perguntou-me ainda o meu amigo.
— Nunca. Isto é, uma vez quase fico perdido. A polícia prendeu um sujeito, um marujo, um tipo bronzeado que só falava uma língua esquisita. Chamaram diversos intérpretes, ninguém o entendia. Fui também chamado, com todos os respeitos que a minha sabedoria merecia, naturalmente. Demorei-me em ir, mas fui afinal. O homem já estava solto, graças à intervenção do cônsul holandês, a quem ele se fez compreender com meia dúzia de palavras holandesas. E o tal marujo era javanês — uf!
Chegou, enfim, a época do congresso, e lá fui para a Europa. Que delícia! Assisti à inauguração e às sessões preparatórias. Inscreveram-me na seção do tupi-guarani e eu abalei para Paris. Antes, porém, fiz publicar no Mensageiro de Bale o meu retrato, notas biográficas e bibliográficas. Quando voltei, o presidente pediu-me desculpas por me ter dado aquela seção; não conhecia os meus trabalhos e julgara que, por ser eu americano brasileiro, me estava naturalmente indicada a seção do tupi- guarani. Aceitei as explicações e até hoje ainda não pude escrever as minhas obras sobre o javanês, para lhe mandar, conforme prometi.
Acabado o congresso, fiz publicar extratos do artigo do Mensageiro de Bale, em Berlim, em Turim e Paris, onde os leitores de minhas obras me ofereceram um banquete, presidido pelo Senador Gorot. Custou-me toda essa brincadeira, inclusive o banquete que me foi oferecido, cerca de dez mil francos, quase toda a herança do crédulo e bom Barão de Jacuecanga.
Não perdi meu tempo nem meu dinheiro. Passei a ser uma glória nacional e, ao saltar no cais Pharoux, recebi uma ovação de todas as classes sociais e o presidente da república, dias depois, convidava-me para almoçar em sua companhia.
Dentro de seis meses fui despachado cônsul em Havana, onde estive seis anos e para onde voltarei, a fim de aperfeiçoar os meus estudos das línguas da Malaia, Melanésia e Polinésia.
— É fantástico, observou Castro, agarrando o copo de cerveja.
— Olha: se não fosse estar contente, sabes que ia ser ?
— Que?
— Bacteriologista eminente. Vamos?
— Vamos.
Gazeta da Tarde, Rio.28-4-l9ll.
Fim

Song


MEIRELES, C. Complete poetry. 4th ed. Rio de Janeiro: Nova Aguilar, 1993


In the imbalance of the seas,
the prows turn on their own …
In one of the ships that sank
is that you were certainly coming.
I waited for you all the centuries
without despair and without heartbreak,
and died of endless deaths
always keeping the same face
When the waves carried you
my eyes, between water and sand,
blinded like the statues,
to everything that exists outside.
My hands stopped in the air
and hardened by the wind,
and lost the color they had
and the memory of the movement.
And the smile I carried you
it came off and fell off me:
and only maybe he still lives
inside these endless waters.

Canção

MEIRELES, C. Poesia completa. 4 ed. Rio de Janeiro: Nova Aguilar, 1993

No desequilíbrio dos mares,
as proas giram sozinhas…
Numa das naves que afundaram
é que certamente tu vinhas.

Eu te esperei todos os séculos
sem desespero e sem desgosto,
e morri de infinitas mortes
guardando sempre o mesmo rosto

Quando as ondas te carregaram
meu olhos, entre águas e areias,
cegaram como os das estátuas,
a tudo quanto existe alheias.

Minhas mãos pararam sobre o ar
e endureceram junto ao vento,
e perderam a cor que tinham
e a lembrança do movimento.

E o sorriso que eu te levava
desprendeu-se e caiu de mim:
e só talvez ele ainda viva
dentro destas águas sem fim.

Canção

No desequilíbrio dos mares,
as proas giram sozinhas…
Numa das naves que afundaram
é que certamente tu vinhas.

Eu te esperei todos os séculos
sem desespero e sem desgosto,
e morri de infinitas mortes
guardando sempre o mesmo rosto

Quando as ondas te carregaram
meu olhos, entre águas e areias,
cegaram como os das estátuas,
a tudo quanto existe alheias.

Minhas mãos pararam sobre o ar
e endureceram junto ao vento,
e perderam a cor que tinham
e a lembrança do movimento.

E o sorriso que eu te levava
desprendeu-se e caiu de mim:
e só talvez ele ainda viva
dentro destas águas sem fim.